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More work needed to control phishing


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 PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:46 am   
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Crane Hassold raises a valid point in his November 2 post on his blog, phishlabs.

Users are blurring their understanding of secure (encrypted) websites. Have to say, I also lose clear vision in regards the details of web surfing, so his blog post was a good reminder.

One of his points boils down to this blurb: https:// can very securely deliver fraud, garbage and lies. Give the post a read?

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 PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:31 pm   
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Hassold is certainly correct, but the majority of internet users are oblivious. At least 50% of this household pays very little attention to such boring matters as "internet security". ;<))

As a Linux user, I've become very lazy/sloppy about browsing. Once in awhile, I get amused as a window pops up that's blatantly designed to snare a Windows user.

Am toying with the idea of just using the TAILS live distro with a USB stick containing my URLs, passwords, etc. Knew a guy back in China that only went online with a liveCD with a thumbdrive for passwords and an external drive for data. He only used the tower offline. A few more steps to complete tasks, but it seemed like a simple approach to a single user trying to protect himself.

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 PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:45 pm   
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Interesting to see your comments regarding the use of live media and USB. That's a relatively easy way to minimize risk without having to possess a vast amount of knowledge or perform significant planning.

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 PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:57 am   
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I like the idea of read-only operating systems, but you still have to reboot to correct a hacked OS, and you'd only reboot if you could tell that you were hacked in the first place. I scarcely think I am a target, but absolutely, I can be fooled.

Me, I've secured a bit in the past 4+ years. I tend to place a watchful eye on my operations:
-I only mount to transfer data, then immediately sync and unmount. Can't hack a device when it isn't connected, a hacker would have to be waiting for me to attach specific devices in order for them to hack something worthwhile.
-If I need to move many files (needing a long time) to a new device, then I'll just disconnect from the internet. Hackers mirroring that data transfer for later clandestine collection? Well, then, I'd see the unusual increase in outbound traffic next time I connected.
-Clear text account information stored in any common file? Nah. KeePassX.
-Cut and paste credentials? Nope, no clipboard, since the later clipboards tend to store copies until either the data is stepped out of the buffer or the user clears the clipboard history.
-Store logins in a browser? No, and I hate getting nagged for EVERY login screen (I delete cookies).

Being a web user is fraught with many precautions and tactics. Yet going offline would present very little pleasure, right? Age old problem: Pleasures beget greed (my internet pleasure draws the pleasure providing service to seek money or personally identifiable data which can be sold for money).

So the history lesson is this: we started having problems once we decided to go online.

Catch 22.

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 PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:41 pm   
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There are definitely risks - to business, to individuals, to anyone using the Internet or any kind of exchange where someone can obtain and retain any information, no doubt about it.

With reasonable care, I've not lost anything of personal value, and I've probably used online computing longer than any of you, or at least as long.

I've been using computers since the early seventies and even in the early days, I used what was called an "acoustic coupler" - put an analog phone into a device that "listens" to the beeps and translates them into signals.

Years later we had modems, and years after that we had dedicated circuits and direct network access - something we now take for granted. We even have completely wireless access to even faster networks today.

I'm sure there are those who have "information" collected about me. I have a job, I've never noticed any money taken from me by a computer - people in relationship to me were the ones doing that WITHOUT the help of a computer. Most of them didn't know how to get my computer information.

Will I ever be compromised on a computer or other connected device? Maybe. For me, there have been sufficient benefits, employment, interesting work and other factors that justify it after all of these years. In a couple more years, I'll be doing less day to day computing and relying on various devices only on occasion to assist me in remembering things and managing my affairs.

I'm familiar enough with phishing schemes and other intrusions that I guess I'm used to utilizing my own safeguarding methods.

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 PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:03 pm   
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The educated consumer.

Still, as technology progresses, the amount of skill and education required of the consumer will ultimately exceed the consumers desire to use that technology.

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 PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2017 5:30 pm   
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mmmna wrote:
The educated consumer.

Still, as technology progresses, the amount of skill and education required of the consumer will ultimately exceed the consumers desire to use that technology.


You're definitely right about that; there is already too much noise and junk that either scares or pushes a lot of people away from many places that may contain useful information, but are far too complex and filled with unnecessary complication.

TMI - too much information - is prevalent in many places - here included.

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