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debdelta


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 PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 11:46 pm   
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Joined: Sat May 01, 2004 2:37 pm
Posts: 3887
Location: AZ, USA
Gotten used to Fedora/RHEL/CentOS from work and how it doesn't download full packages for upgrades, instead just downloading delta rpm's (thus saving a lot of bandwidth especially on large packages), and was wondering if there was some way to get apt to do the same. Turns out, there is a program called debdelta that will do it. I've been using for a few months now testing it out, and if there's anyone here using a debian based distro that has limited bandwidth/speed, this is an awesome program. MUCH slower on super-fast connections due to it creating the delta instead of just downloading a delta package like on the red hat systems, but when large packages (like browsers, libreoffice, etc) upgrade, it can save HUNDREDS of megabytes of download time...

usage:

Code:
apt update
debdelta-upgrade
apt (dist-)upgrade


note - although debian based, I have been unable to get this to work on Ubuntu. I've tested on 16.04, and even though debdelta functions, apt seems to ignore the created packages and redownloads them. Not sure if it was a problem with my VM, or if it's a problem with how Ubuntu mucks with everything. In the end, I dislike using Ubuntu too much to care.

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Nightlund - AMD FX8320/16 G/960 SSD/GTX 760 2GB/Realtek 1 GB/Deb 9+W10
Excelsior - i7-6600U/32 GB/512 SSD/HD520/8265/Deb 9
Titan - i5-6440HQ/16G/1TB SSD/HD530/8265/Deb 9+W10
Wildmage - i5-5300U/16 G/1TB SSD/HD5500/8265/Arch
Defiant - i5-5200U/16G/256 SSD/HD5500/8260/Deb 10
Lichking - i5-5300U/8G/480 SSD/HD5500/8260/Deb 9
Dretch - i5-3380M/8G/480 SSD/HD4000/7260/Arch


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 PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 1:10 pm   
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Location: Clinton Township, Michigan
That's nice to know Tim. My download speeds are actually pretty good, and at times, if I pick the "right hours" - kind of in between the time that people in the area are streaming a lot of regular content and the really late hours when the backups, heavy overnight transfers, and probably pornographic content are on the rise, I try to get my software updates in somewhere in between the two. If I do them either in the late morning or early afternoon on the weekend or in the 8-10 Pm window on weekday evenings, I can sometimes get repo transfers peaking between 4000-5000 KBPS, often around 4200-4300, which allows me to pull even a few hundred good sized package updates onto my system. Frankly, it takes longer to actually load and install them than it does to download them, because my network is pretty good.

But it would be nice for Debian to do some of the same optimizations that the Fedora project has done recently. In the past, the two slowest systems to update were Fedora and openSUSE, but both of them have improved in one way or another. For Fedora (and Red Hat) they've vastly improved their packaging and the speed at which both the downloads and the installations take place. For openSUSE, they've had major quality improvements over the past several releases.

Debian used to be miles ahead of either of them. I still prefer Debian because I've had so much time with it and so much success, and that is still the case, but the differentiation between it and the others isn't quite as wide as it once was. The Enterprise versions of Red Hat and SUSE have undoubtedly helped in that regard.

Another sidebar: From a simplicity standpoint, one RPM-based distribution that's interestingly used apt and Synaptic from its inception, and has been a worthy alternative to the MEPIS/antiX/MX Debian base - that would be PCLinuxOS. Texas based "Texstar" used to package .RPM software that could be used on Mandrake, Caldera OpenLinux, Red Hat (and maybe SUSE) back in the early 2000s, and in 2003 he turned it into his own PCLinuxOS, right around the same time period that Warren Woodford first brought out MEPIS, then SimplyMEPIS.

Woodford has gone in different directions, making a lot more money by being involved in legal dealings, health care, start-up project feasibility, analysis, design, development and deployment, and he seems to do well.

Anticapitalista (his handle), took on MEPIS under another name, antiX, and a "MEPIS Lovers" community project called MX. To me, MX is a Debian derivative that provides something lighter, simpler, and somewhat more stable than the likes of Linux Mint, though Mint can be useful for those who want something close to a drop in system that works. MX is faster, leaner, and simpler by default, and though the base system is very simple, having the antiX toolchest available, it's possible to create whatever you want with either an MX or an antiX system, and that's what I like about them.

MX and PCLinuxOS are the systems I use when I don't have any time at all to fiddle, other than to update any software while I'm doing my blog, Wiki, forum, and Email reading.

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Brian Masinick
Distros: MX-16, antiX, Debian


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 PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 4:07 pm   
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Joined: Sat May 01, 2004 2:37 pm
Posts: 3887
Location: AZ, USA
Yeah, not sure how useful it would be for most people, but I think we still have a couple users who are on rather slow connections, so it could be of use to some. I just like it because it's a huge boost in efficiency, even if I don't actually NEED to use it.

_________________
Nightlund - AMD FX8320/16 G/960 SSD/GTX 760 2GB/Realtek 1 GB/Deb 9+W10
Excelsior - i7-6600U/32 GB/512 SSD/HD520/8265/Deb 9
Titan - i5-6440HQ/16G/1TB SSD/HD530/8265/Deb 9+W10
Wildmage - i5-5300U/16 G/1TB SSD/HD5500/8265/Arch
Defiant - i5-5200U/16G/256 SSD/HD5500/8260/Deb 10
Lichking - i5-5300U/8G/480 SSD/HD5500/8260/Deb 9
Dretch - i5-3380M/8G/480 SSD/HD4000/7260/Arch


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 PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 12:34 pm   
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Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 12:39 am
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Location: Clinton Township, Michigan
There are definitely people out there who don't always have high speed links, especially if they are in rural areas. I know that JP, for instance, can sometimes get good links, but he has to go to specific places in order to get them, which can be difficult at certain times!

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Brian Masinick
Distros: MX-16, antiX, Debian


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