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Which linux web browser do you like the most?
Galeon 5%  5%  [ 3 ]
Konqueror 8%  8%  [ 5 ]
Mozilla 47%  47%  [ 28 ]
Netscape 5%  5%  [ 3 ]
Opera 15%  15%  [ 9 ]
Other browser - Not listed on this poll. 19%  19%  [ 11 ]
Total votes : 59
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 PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 2:43 pm   
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jester wrote:
Perhaps Crouse would update the poll (not sure what that would do to results) but we are missing (at least) Chrome, Midori, and Epiphany

Or maybe it's time for a new 2010/2011 poll Netscape has after all gone EOL...



Start a new thread and you can just create a new poll :) We can then lock this thread and point to the new one ;)

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 PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 2:21 am   
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Curious about something.. Seems like the error msgs for Opera look much like an app running through Wine. Is Opera ported to Linux or just include a personalized version of Wine?

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 PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 3:59 am   
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Opera has had native versions on Linux and many platforms for over a decade.
I used a version of Opera on QNX in late 2001 or early 2002; that gives you an idea - runs on Windows, Linux, UNIX, QNX, Android, probably other devices as well, and was written from the very beginning, anticipating being used on mobile devices, so they have been a mobile browser leader (possibly the first in that space). Very definitely native versions for many platforms, most certainly including Linux. I'm planning on using it later this evening in fact.

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 PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 4:01 am   
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masinick wrote:
Opera has had native versions on Linux and many platforms for over a decade.
...
Very definitely native versions for many platforms, most certainly including Linux.
Opera is the browser used by Nintendo Wii.

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 PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:18 pm   
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mmmna wrote:
masinick wrote:
Opera has had native versions on Linux and many platforms for over a decade.
...
Very definitely native versions for many platforms, most certainly including Linux.
Opera is the browser used by Nintendo Wii.


I'm not surprised. Opera had a vision of being on small devices quite a long time ago. I put it on my Droid and it works, but not as well as the native browsers for some reason. Still, it is a good browser for many platforms.

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 PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 5:15 pm   
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I liked the interface for the opera browser on android, but I had a lot of trouble with it. Quite often pages simply wouldn't load - perhaps they were having trouble with their caching/compression thing that they do for webpages. I tried turning that off and things were better, but often very very slow. Perhaps I should see if there's an update and give it another try.


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 PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 3:12 pm   
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This is an old thread but I'm new here and I didn't see anyone mention dwb. I use it quite a lot especially for quick trips to the arch wiki etc. It is very lite and fast though it sometimes has problems with more complex websites. Dwb is also very keyboard centric so once you get the hang of the keystrokes your hands rarely have to leave the keyboard. If I'm watching a lot of youtube videos I stick with firefox mainly because of the nice media plugins.

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 PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 9:48 am   
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Welcome to usalug, Macwillie.
I'm going to have to check out dwb.

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 PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 7:42 pm   
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For a guy who tries out a lot of Web browsers, obviously I have not tried all of them. Dwb is one I've not run across, but then again, my use of Arch over the past year or two has been limited to derivatives, in particular, Manjaro, and I've not noticed dwb in my travels there.

I have used plenty of other interesting browsers over the years.

Going back to the very early days of Web browsers, I used an early to mid nineties version of Spyglass Mosaic, which was later sold to Microsoft, and Microsoft used the source code from Mosaic (and other sources) to create early versions of Internet Explorer.

I used Netscape 1 right up through the last versions of Netscape, first on UNIX workstations and later on Linux systems. When Mozilla came up with a rewrite of Netscape, producing both Mozilla and Netscape branded browsers, I used those. When Mozilla went from a browser suite with Email, News, Composer, IRC, and browsing components (a.k.a. Mozilla, later Seamonkey) and called the early versions Firebird and Phoenix, later branded Firefox, I tested those early browsers.

I used Opera on UNIX, Linux, and even on QNX, a real time operating system.

Command-based browsers I've used include Lynx, links, links2, elinks, w3. Light gui browsers I've used include Dillo and a few others I don't have around any more. Galeon, Epiphany, Konqueror, Conqueror (Mozilla-based browser with an interesting Emacs interface with a Mozilla "Gecko" rendering engine), and lots of others I can't remember right at this moment.

Using Seamonkey at the moment, the current Mozilla suite; using the 26.2 Aurora (beta) build.

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 PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:21 pm   
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masinick wrote:
This thread is sticky, but we haven't done anything with it in over two years, so I wanted to comment on the state of the art in browsers.

In 2008, the browser community awoke and started to do a lot of things to affect the future landscape of browsers. Even Internet Explorer finally started to wake up and make some desperately needed improvements to their browser. Internet Explorer 8 on Windows is a far cry from the most capable browsers you can get, but it is an infinite (and desperately needed) improvement over the terrible Internet Explorer 6 and the barely improved Internet Explorer 7. Internet Explorer 8 is hardly the ideal browser, but if you are stuck on Windows anywhere and forced to use Microsoft products, it is at least a major improvement.

...


Chrome and Safari have attracted some attention because they are trying to innovate with the use of lightweight threaded processes, a different user interface, and improved Javascript engines.
...

2017 note: (*Interesting:*) Chrome and Safari are much larger in size and scope than those early, light, fast implementations!

As far as other lightweight browsers, I regularly use links and elinks in some scripts that I run regularly to grab weather information, which I frequently post in the Community weather thread.


I have not used the OLD lightweight Web browsers recently; their value is limited these days, and only useful in scripts that can quickly read predominantly text-based pages.

I still use Firefox more than anything else on Linux hardware and even on my phone. At work, I have Internet Explorer 11, and it's much better than the old IE 6, but it still stumbles at times. Overall it provides the best integration with programs our company creates because most of them have been created on Windows with Internet Explorer in mind, but here, Google Chrome offers clear advantages over IE. If there are scripts or other objects on a particular Web page, they almost always perform better in Chrome over IE. The only advantage, if any, that IE holds is that certain "legacy" capabilities are better supported, otherwise Internet Explorer is a dead end. Moreover, Microsoft's investments in "Edge", their latest browser technology, have not been particularly well received by anyone. I don't even have it on my work equipment, and I'm certainly not going to use it on my personal systems.

So I find my best overall interests in Firefox - certainly on any of my personal equipment. In the office, I use what I'm given, period.

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 PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:00 pm   
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And certainly, there is this recent adaptation of Chromium called Slimjet. Essentially it has embedded Adblock, and has worked to remove the Google callbacks and backdoors.

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 PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:56 pm   
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mmmna wrote:
And certainly, there is this recent adaptation of Chromium called Slimjet. Essentially it has embedded Adblock, and has worked to remove the Google callbacks and backdoors.


I haven't done much with Slimjet; I think I downloaded it once and had difficulties with it matching the web-based libraries on my system, but I don't remember for sure because I've not had much time recently to experiment with anything - including editors and browsers - two items that I've experimented with heavily in the past.

I'll try to keep Slimjet in mind if I can squeeze in a little testing time.

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 PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:23 pm   
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masinick wrote:
mmmna wrote:
masinick wrote:
Opera has had native versions on Linux and many platforms for over a decade.
...
Very definitely native versions for many platforms, most certainly including Linux.
Opera is the browser used by Nintendo Wii.


I'm not surprised. Opera had a vision of being on small devices quite a long time ago. I put it on my Droid and it works, but not as well as the native browsers for some reason. Still, it is a good browser for many platforms.


I've used Opera Mini on a few of my Droid phones with positive results. I was also using a spin-off of Chromium that I think one of the original Chrome / Chromium developers built - his implementation, like Slimjet, was also focused on minimizing, if not entirely eliminating Cookies and other "breadcrumbs" that Google and many other advertisers use to collect information.

I do frequently use Firefox Focus on my current MOTO G5 Plus, and it has a similar idea; it doesn't store or retain anything. That's reassuring in some ways, though you always have to enter authentication credentials every time on pages requiring authentication, because no details are saved; that is one trade-off, but probably one that many people are happy to trade in exchange for leaving fewer "trails" along the way, though I'm not sure if it's able to entirely prevent tracking.

I often use DuckDuckGo for searching; it doesn't store or save any information; it's simple and fast, yet it produces solid results.

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 PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:45 pm   
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masinick wrote:
I haven't done much with Slimjet; I think I downloaded it once and had difficulties with it matching the web-based libraries on my system, but I don't remember for sure because I've not had much time recently to experiment with anything - including editors and browsers - two items that I've experimented with heavily in the past.

I'll try to keep Slimjet in mind if I can squeeze in a little testing time.
Hoping you can give slimjet a test, is easy to install if you get the tar.gz,: extract the tar.gz, open the extracted folder in a console, run the flashpeak-slimjet script, choose sudo or su, then, when the script has completed, you are done. Just look for the Slimjet icon in your menus. After slimjet launches, you need only install a codec if you want web videos. Aside from the codec, Slimjet from the tar.gz is essentially static linked to stuff in its extracted folder.

Is mostly compatible with Chrome add-ons, too.

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 PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:38 pm   
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I hope I can get to it too. As I expected though, I had just enough computer time this weekend to do some essentials - such as keeping the unread Email volume down so I don't drown in it when I'm looking for something that I'm actually interested in, and I had to spend time on a small, part time thing I work on managing a mailing list. Other than that, I attended a local high school fund raiser at the school my wife works at, watched a little bit of football (but not all of the games by any means), got in a bit of nap time so I wouldn't be too worn out during the week, and presto, the weekend came and went!

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